Speech and Debate
  Fishers High School Speech and Debate
Calendar | Competitor Info | Parents | Practice | Contact Info | Wall of Fame
 
Meet Sign-Up Link to 4n6 Fanatics
Fishers Speech and Debate Dress Code
Ladies:
  • All skirts and dresses must be knee length, and check the fit. You do not want a fit that is too tight.
  • Shoulders must be covered, and be mindful of cleavage.
  • If you choose to wear a skirt or dress you MUST wear panty hose or tights. Only nude or black hose are allowed. No cut outs or runs allowed.
  • Heels are not to be higher than three inches, remember you need to be able to walk with grace and perform well! Heels should not be thin either, and wider heels are recommended. Also remember you CAN wear flats and we highly suggest them!
  • No bracelets or rings at all. Make sure necklaces are not noisy or distracting and your earrings should not dangle. Ankle bracelets that show are not allowed.
Gentlemen:
  • You must wear a tie or bow tie. Be aware of clashing tie and shirts patterns as that can be very distracting.
  • No rings or other jewelry what so ever.
  • We highly suggest a full suit, but a sport coat and slacks is also acceptable.
  • Dress shoes only! And make sure you are wearing the correct color socks.
This dress code is in place to ensure the team image is maintained, but mostly so you as a competitor are not at a disadvantage due to what you are wearing. Please respect yourself and the team and follow these rules. Those breaking rules on multiple occasions will be spoken too. If you have any questions please speak to a coach or captain.
 
Meet Expectations:
  • All competitors must ride to and from the meet on the bus unless arrangements have been made with Mr. Kennedy.
  • All Fishers Speech members will warm up with the team upon arrival at the site of competition.
  • Competitors must wait outside the room until a judge has entered.
  • Be mindful of your noise level outside of rooms where rounds are going on.
  • During the meet, do not go wandering the school, stay in the central meeting area. At no time should you leave the reaches of the school where the meet is occurring.
  • Any mess you make you are to clean up.
  • At awards all competitors must be ready to go on stage at any moment. This means you need to be in full speech attire. This includes proper shoes.
  • The one clap rule is in effect until the champion is announced in which full applause and a standing ovation is in order.
  • Do NOT gasp or make noise when the second place finisher is announced leaving your teammate as champion.
  • All received ribbons are to be given to coaches to be displayed in the trophy case during the season.



Event Descriptions
Click the event name for an informative video!

Interpretation
  • Dramatic Interpretation
    • Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. With a spotlight on character development and depth, this event focuses on the student’s ability to convey emotion through the use of a dramatic text. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance, and state the title and the author.
  • Duo Interpretation
    • Two competitors team up to deliver a ten-minute performance of a published play or story. Using off-stage focus, competitors convey emotion and environment through a variety of performance techniques focusing on the relationships and interactions between the characters. No props or costumes are used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the students to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.
  • Humorous Interpretation
    • Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. Humorous Interpretation is designed to test a student’s comedic skills through script analysis, delivery, timing, and character development. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.
Public Address
  • Informative Speaking
    • Students author and deliver a ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Competitors create the speech to educate the audience on a particular topic. All topics must be informative in nature; the goal is to educate, not to advocate. Visual aids are permitted, but not required. The speech is delivered from memory.
  • Original Oratory
    • Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, competitors craft an argument using evidence, logic, and emotional appeals. Topics range widely, and can be informative or persuasive in nature. The speech is delivered from memory.
  • Programmed Oral Interpretation (POI)
    • Using selections from Prose, Poetry and Drama students create a ten minute performance around a central theme. Program Oral Interpretation is designed to test a student’s ability to intersplice multiple types of literature into a single, cohesive performance. A manuscript is required and may be used as a prop within the performance if the performer maintains control of the manuscript at all times. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author of each selection.
  • Poetry
    • Using a selection or selections of literature, students provide an oral interpretation of poetry. Poetry is characterized by writing that conveys ideas, experiences, and emotions through language and expression. Students may choose traditional poetry, often characterized by rhyme or rhythm, or nontraditional poetry, which often has a rhythmic flow but is not necessarily structured by formal meter (meter is a beat, pattern, or structure, such as iambic pentameter). Students may not use prose, nor drama (plays) in this category. This event is seven minutes, including an introduction.
  • Prose
    • Using a short story, parts of a novel, or other published work of prose, students provide an oral interpretation of a selection of materials. Typically a single piece of literature, prose can be drawn from works of fiction or non-fiction. Prose corresponds to common speech patterns and may combine elements of narration and dialogue. Students may not use poetry, or drama (plays), in this category. This event is seven minutes, including an introduction.
Limited Prep
  • Impromptu
    • Impromptu is a public speaking event where students have seven minutes to select a topic, brainstorm their ideas, outline and deliver a speech. The speech is given without notes and uses an introduction, body, and conclusion. The speech can be light-hearted or serious. It can be based upon prompts that range from nursery rhymes, current events, celebrities, organizations, and more.
  • International Extemporaneous Speaking
    • Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to international current events and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the internet during preparation. Topics range from country-specific issues to regional concerns to foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory.
  • United States Extemporaneous Speaking
    • Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to current events in the United States and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the internet during preparation. Topics range from political matters to economic concerns to U.S. foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory.
Debate
  • Big Questions
    • Big Questions is designed to enhance students’ current debate experiences, opening their minds and encouraging them to engage in life discussion that may not align with their previously held beliefs. Whether or not students change their opinion, the rich experience of this debate event will advance their knowledge, comfort, and interest in learning more about the subject matter.
  • Congress
    • A simulation of the U.S. legislative process, students generate a series of bills and resolutions for debate in Congressional Debate. Debaters alternate delivering speeches for and against the topic in a group setting. An elected student serves as a presiding officer to ensure debate flows smoothly. Students are assessed on their research, argumentation, and delivery skills, as well as their knowledge and use of parliamentary procedure.
  • Discussion
    • Discussion is an event where 5-7 people sit around a table and hold an hour long discussion about the topic provided to them. This can vary from a poem to an article about current events. The purpose of this event is to enhance a person's ability to have a conversation in everyday life and talk about conflicting ideas in a meaningful way. A person will leave a discussion round with a greater knowledge of the topic presented to them and possibly a changed opinion.
  • Lincoln-Douglas
    • In this one-on-one format, students debate a topic provided by the National Speech & Debate Association. Topics range from individual freedom versus the collective good to economic development versus environmental protection. Students may consult evidence gathered prior to the debate but may not use the internet in round. An entire debate is roughly 45 minutes and consists of constructive speeches, rebuttals, and cross-examination.
  • Public Forum
    • Public Forum involves opposing teams of two, debating a topic concerning a current event. Proceeding a coin toss, the winners choose which side to debate (PRO or CON) or which speaker position they prefer (1st or 2nd), and the other team receives the remaining option. Students present cases, engage in rebuttal and refutation, and also participate in a “crossfire” (similar to a cross examination) with the opportunity to question the opposing team. Often times community members are recruited to judge this event.
  • World Schools
    • World Schools Debate features a dynamic format combining the concepts of “prepared” topics with “impromptu” topics, encouraging debaters to focus on specified issues rather than debate theory or procedural arguments. This highly interactive style of debate allows debaters to engage each other, even during speeches. This challenging format requires good teamwork and in-depth quality argumentation.